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If you have thoughts or questions about the novel or the non-fiction book, please send them along and we'll start a discussion topic. Scroll down the page to read and comment on previous questions. And here's a link to some podcasts: click here


Why do we tell stories?

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Why do we tell stories?

Q. When you wrote your script and realized that, like characters in movies, people are stuck in their stories, did you wonder why we write stories in the first place?

A. During the screenwriting process, two powerful, hidden illusions became clear to us. Read more

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Overcoming memories.

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Overcoming memories.

Q. How do we not let our past experiences and memories—along with our strong survival instinct—influence and inform our actions, so we can live our life in alignment with our true self?

A. Let's first try to understand the nature of what we're dealing with. Your brain is permanently encased in a dark enclosure, closed off from direct contact with the world. Read more.

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How does one express his or her true essence?

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How does one express his or her true essence?

Q. If living a life as Keats is ultimately about experiencing one's true essence, what does this really mean? Can you please describe a life of expressing one's true essence.

A. Gandhi described happiness as, "when what you think, what you say, and what you do are in harmony." Read more.

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What does it mean to "let Keats lead?"

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What does it mean to "let Keats lead?"

Q. After reading the nonfiction book, I walked away with a great dislike for Coleridge. In fact, my Coleridge-mind has held me back on more occasions than I care to remember. However, I don't think that being "all Keats" is practical, or realistic. Could you explain what you mean by "let Keats lead?"

A. Let's first consider our definition of Keats and Coleridge as ways of thinking. Read more.

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What is negative capability?

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What is negative capability?

Q. In your nonfiction book, you make reference to "negative capability." I've looked up the poet John Keats's use of the phrase and I'm still not quite clear on the concept.

A. We're not sure that anyone has a "clear" understanding of Keats's idea, since he only used the term once in a letter to his brothers. Read more.

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Fate or destiny?

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Fate or destiny?

Q. Do you think our destiny chooses us, and that we can't run from who we are?

A. If you stay in your conditioned state, hypnotically moving through life, then your fate will choose you. Read more.

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Suggestion for reading.

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Suggestion for reading.

Q. How would you suggest someone approach reading these books, i.e. if you were only going to read one, what would be your criteria for picking AND if you were going to read both, which order would you read them?

A. Thank you for asking. It's made us think about the evolution of I am Keats, and the possible confusion our chaotic dance with the Universe may have created for others. :) Read more.

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Conscious or unconscious?

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Conscious or unconscious?

Q. In your nonfiction book, you write that Coleridge represents our "thinking mind" and Keats our "feeling mind." Does that mean that Coleridge is our conscious mind, and Keats our unconscious?

A. This is a bit confusing, so let's start with the human brain. Read more.

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Who's in control?

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Who's in control?

Q. It seems although Coleridge has Keats on a leash, it is Coleridge who is the more malleable of the two. What I mean is: it seems the more information you acquire without proper curation, the more beliefs you develop, which when mixed with imagination can spawn fear and anxieties. It is for the seemingly "credible" reason of preservation that Coleridge stifles Keats.  

So we wanted to ask what you think about controlling the information Coleridge is exposed to as a means for allowing Keats to shine?

A. So, is Coleridge more malleable? If by malleable you mean impressionable, easily influenced... then yes, absolutely! Read more.

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